How to make a reversible poncho?

Hello, I feel I should say welcome to my blog as I’ve neglected it as of late. It’s funny, sewing has been my sanity during this lockdown period but I haven’t been documenting the process. I recently made this reversible poncho as a layering piece to add to my winter wardrobe, it was so quick and easy to make. I made another one for my lovely friend Celiwe, and decided to document the process to share a quick tutorial on how to make your own.

What supplies you need?

  • 1.5m ankara fabric or any other cotton fabric
  • 1.5m polar fleece fabric
  • 20cm x 2cm strip of hemming web/spider (optional)
  • Matching thread

Please note that to make yours longer, you can decide to use 2m of fabric for length.

Let’s get started:

Step 1: fold fabric length wise in half bringing the cut edges together, this will be the length of your poncho. Fold fabric again in half, this time with salvages touching.

Step 2: mark with pins the half way marks.

Step 3: open the fabric so its only folded once, length wise. From the pin marking half of the fabric, mark 2.5cm on either side of the pin.

Step 4: cut the fabric at the 2.5cm markings, making sure you only cut top half of the fabric. This is the front opening of the poncho. The uncut side is the back.

Step 5: you can trim the corners so your poncho has a curved finish.

Repeat step 1 – 5 on the other fabric!

Let’s start sewing:

Step 1: put fabric right sides together, joining the front opening of the poncho. Sew with one continuous stitch joining the fronts together. For all sewing I used standard 1.5cm allowance.

Step 2: align and pin the rest of the poncho, starting at the bottom front and all the way around the back to the other side of the bottom front.

Step 3: sew using one continuous stitch leaving the your 15cm – 20cm gap at the back of the poncho. This gap you will use to turn the poncho right side.

Step 4: clip around all the curved edges making sure you don’t clip through your stitch. This will ensure that the curved edges lay flat when you turn the poncho the right way.

Step 5: turn your poncho the right way around, give it a good press for a clean finish. You can now use your hemming web/spider sandwich it into the gap, iron over and the the gap is closed. You can also hand stitch the gap close using an invisible stitch. I recommend these two finishes if you want to achieve the cleanest finishes possible.

Note: what is hemming web/spider? Hemming web is a light weight fabric adhesive that softens when ironed therefore sticking the two opposing fabrics together. This is a great substitute for stitching when needing to close gaps in belts, jackets and dresses. The best part, it is much quicker than hand stitching and does not leave any stitch marks visible, as machine sewing will when closing those gaps. I bought 1m from the fabric store this can last for years because you use so little at a time. Interesting tid bit, the correct name is hemming web or hemming tape but in South Africa, it’s we call it Spider because it looks like a spiders web 🤣😂 so my fellow South Africans, when looking for it at the fabric store, ask for spider 🤣

Well done, you all done, you have a lovely warm but stylish poncho to add to you winter wardrobe. If you make yourself one, please share it with me by tagging me @sewstartino on Instagram. I would love to see your wonderful creations 😍🌸

Stay safe and warm ❤️ from Tino ❤️

2 thoughts on “How to make a reversible poncho?

  1. Such a stunning and an easy make. Nothing feels great like walking around all covered up in some good looking blanket-warm poncho. I love it. Thank you for sharing

    Like

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